Saint Bernard

St Bernards stand out like a sore thumb because of their hefty size. They stand tall and proud with a massive frame. They are strong, fit-looking dogs with a dense coat that is more profuse around the neck and legs. Cross breeding means that the Saint Bernard we know and love today looks very different from the original breed. These gentle giants make a patient and calm canine companion but their size does need to be given some consideration.

Other Names
St Bernhardshund
Country of Origin
Switzerland
Colour
Solid white with red markings; solid red with white markings or brindle patches with white.
Size
Large
Height / Weight
Height 70cms and 65cms for bitches. There are no upper limits but the tallest recorded is 91cms. Weight averages 68 to 91 kgs.
Health
Common ailments:Bones (Acquired) - Tumours, Bones (Developmental) - Hip dysplasia, Brain (Acquired) - Meningitis - Degeneration, Endocrine - Diabetes mellitus (diabetes), Eye - Distichiasis, Eye - Ectropion, Eye - Entropion, Haemolymphatic - Bleeding disorders - Haemophilia, Pituitary abnormalities, Stomach - Gastric dilation (Bloat), GDV Gastric torsion
Life Span
8-10 years
Intelligence
Because St Bernards are HUGE, socialisation and training should start while it's a pup. St Bernards are slow thinkers so trainers need to remain calm and consistent in their commands.
Exercise
Medium
Suitability (Children)
Medium
Feeding

St Bernard puppies need the correct food when little to ensure correct growth and development of bones as they grow. Seek advice from the breeder as diet can really affect this breed's orthopedic wellness. Over-supplementation, along with feeding poor quality food can lead to growth complications. Its size makes it one of the more expensive breeds to feed. 

Feeding Cost
$20+ P/w
Other Cost
Excercise
Exercising St Bernard puppies must be done very gradually to avoid putting excess strain on their growing bones and tender tissues and, even with the adult dog, care must taken to build up exercise gradually. Despite their size, copious amounts of exercise isn't required.
Ailments
Common ailments:Bones (Acquired) - Tumours, Bones (Developmental) - Hip dysplasia, Brain (Acquired) - Meningitis - Degeneration, Endocrine - Diabetes mellitus (diabetes), Eye - Distichiasis, Eye - Ectropion, Eye - Entropion, Haemolymphatic - Bleeding disorders - Haemophilia, Pituitary abnormalities, Stomach - Gastric dilation (Bloat), GDV Gastric torsion
Hair Shed
Heavy
Grooming

Grooming is not difficult, it's just that there's a whole lot of dog to groom! Brush or comb your Saint daily to remove loose hairs. Check eyes and ears regularly. Slobber is part and parcel of this mighty breed.

Grooming Frequency
Daily
Trimming
Occassional
The earliest records (paintings and drawings) of the Saint Bernard are from the monks at the Hospice of the Great Saint Bernard Pass in the 1700s. Thought to be descendants of molasses type dogs, Saints were brought to the Alpes by the Romans. The monks realised that Saints, what with their mighty strength and thick coats, were better equipped to rescue travellers and so they became known as rescue dogs.


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