Irish Setter

Irish Setters are simply BEAUTIFUL. Their rich chestnut or mahogany coats are silky soft and feather out at the legs, ears and tail. When striding beside you, the Irish Setter will hold their head high and will be the model of elegance. They are quite muscular dogs and shouldn't carry any excess weight.

Other Names
Irish Red Setter and Red Setter
Country of Origin
Ireland
Colour
The Irish Setter should be a deep red chestnut colour. A small blaze of white may appear on the chest.
Size
Large
Height / Weight
On average dogs stand at 65cms at the withers and weigh 30.5kgs, bitches average at 61cms from the withers and weigh 26kgs.
Health
Can be prone to hip dysplasia and screening for this is very important.Common ailments: Bones (Developmental) - Hip dysplasia, Bones (Developmental) - Osteochondritis, Endocrine - Hypothyroidism, Eye - Cataract - Hereditary, Eye - Progressive retinal atrophy PRA, General diagnosis - Tumour (benign), General diagnosis - Tumour (malignant), Reproduction problems, Rickets, Stomach - Gastric dilation (Bloat), Wheat sensitive enteropathy
Life Span
11-13 years
Intelligence
Irish Setters are born hunters. However they are also easily-distracted hunters, following any and every scent they find. Start obedience training early. With patience and kindness, the Irish Setter is easy to train and can even compete in obedience trials.
Exercise
Medium
Suitability (Children)
High
Feeding

Irish Setters are prone to bloat and as a result can quickly resemble something off Weight Watchers. It's best to only feed them small meals once or twice a day. The breeder should give you advice, and a diet sheet, regarding the feeding of your Irish Setter.

Feeding Cost
$15-$20 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
The Irish Setter needs a lot of exercise. Traditionally bred to hunt birds, the Irish Setter is an active dog that loves to spend time in the great outdoors. Due to its long legs, they are well-suited to run beside you while cycling.
Ailments
Can be prone to hip dysplasia and screening for this is very important.Common ailments: Bones (Developmental) - Hip dysplasia, Bones (Developmental) - Osteochondritis, Endocrine - Hypothyroidism, Eye - Cataract - Hereditary, Eye - Progressive retinal atrophy PRA, General diagnosis - Tumour (benign), General diagnosis - Tumour (malignant), Reproduction problems, Rickets, Stomach - Gastric dilation (Bloat), Wheat sensitive enteropathy
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

The Irish Setter's crowning glory is, of course, the chestnut coat. Daily brushing is essential to keep the feathers from tangling. Ears will need regular cleaning—as they are drop ears, very little air circulation is able to get inside the ear making it a breeding ground for bacteria and ear infection.

 

Grooming Frequency
More than once a week
Trimming
Occassional
Irish Setters are the oldest of the setter group, preceding Gordon and English setters. The country of origin is, of course, Ireland (hopefully you saw that one coming). It is believed the breed developed from old spaniels, setting spaniels and a Scottish setter. The breed was first developed for hunting and has always had a keen nose. However, their mischievous, fun-loving nature makes them distracted hunters who would rather follow a butterfly than chase down a rabbit. In 1882, the Irish Red Setter Club was formed in Dublin, prompted by the breeding programme of The Earl of Enniskellen, who developed the signature solid red coat. Despite this development, the late 1800s still saw show winners with the white and black markings of traditional Red and White Setters and the Gordon Setter. In the 1940s the breed was nearly decimated by the eye disease Progressive Retinal Atrophy, better known as PRA. This disease is a non sex-linked genetic illness that causes night blindness. Thankfully, DNA testing was able to identify carriers of the eye disease and thus, eliminate the disease from the breeding programme. Due to this scientific advance, the breed has recovered itself and the incidence of PRA has dropped dramatically since the 1940s.


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