Chow Chow

This bearlike dog is sometimes compared to a cat due to their independent and sometimes aloof nature. For the right owner, the Chow Chow is very loyal. They are a strong, very furry, medium-sized pooch. The Chow Chow is undeniably cuddly!

Other Names
Songshi Quan
Country of Origin
China
Colour
Chow Chow’s coat comes in red, black, cinnamon, cream or blue.
Size
Medium
Height / Weight
This breed measure between 46 – 56cms and weighs 20 – 32kgs.
Health
Chow Chows are prone to bone problems such as hip and elbow dysplasia, bloating and heatstroke and fleas due to their thick coats.
Life Span
10 - 12 years
Intelligence
The Chow Chow needs a dominant trainer due to their stubborn nature, this training must take place at an early age. Once they see who is ‘boss’ they are somewhat easy to train. Chow Chow’s are very clean dogs and can make the perfect indoor pet.
Exercise
Low
Suitability (Children)
Low
Feeding

Chow Chow’s are undemanding dogs to feed. They are prone to bloating so it is important to feed them twice a day and not just one large meal.

Feeding Cost
$15 - $20 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
This dog does not require much exercise and are perfectly happy doing their own thing in your backyard or at a park. Too much exercise too young and lead to bone and joint related problems so it is important not to make the exercise too strenuous.
Ailments
Chow Chows are prone to bone problems such as hip and elbow dysplasia, bloating and heatstroke and fleas due to their thick coats.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

Grooming must start at an early age. At first a regular brush is needed but when the adult coat begins to come through a regular bath and daily brush is required. The coat is short, thick and abundant, because of this Chow Chow’s must always have shaded areas to retreat to in the warmer months if living outdoors.

 

Grooming Frequency
Daily
Trimming
None
As the origin of the Chow Chow is a mystery it is believed that the dogs originated from Mongolia and China where their meat was a delicacy and their fur was used for clothing. They were then introduced to China to guard the temples against evil spirits. After this they were bred to be hunting, guard dogs and to pull carts. This canine chum was recognised by the American Kennel Club in 1903.


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