Border Terrier

The Border Terrier is a medium-sized dog with typical terrier characteristics. With shaggy dense coats and a bearded muzzle, they are primarily used as working dogs. They make excellent family dogs and are generally easy to train if they feel they are pleasing their owner.

 

Other Names
Border
Country of Origin
Scottish borders near Northeast England
Colour
Red, grizzle and tan, wheaten or blue and tan.
Size
Small
Height / Weight
Borders measure from 28 - 30.5cms and weigh between 5 - 7kgs.
Health
Bone issues, Hip Dysplasia and possible heart murmurs are all common ailments for this breed. They are otherwise very healthy dogs.
Life Span
12-15 years
Intelligence
Borders love to please and will enjoy training if they are rewarded with your patience and a big cuddle. Training should begin early.
Exercise
Medium
Suitability (Children)
High
Feeding

This pooch only needs a small amount of food to match its size. Without regular exercise they are at risk of becoming overweight.

 

Feeding Cost
$5-$10 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
This breed has plenty of energy and sharp hunting instincts. They should be exercised everyday and owners should be careful when taking them off the leash in open areas if they do not want to lose their Border to a fresh animal scent!
Ailments
Bone issues, Hip Dysplasia and possible heart murmurs are all common ailments for this breed. They are otherwise very healthy dogs.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

Their short coat does not require much attention, with occasional brushing needed to remove and dirt or undergrowth from the coat. A Border needs regular eye, ear and teeth checks as well.

 

 

Grooming Frequency
More than once a week
Trimming
None
First developed in the eighteenth century, the Border Terrier originates from the Scottish borders near Northeast England. Their energy and hunting skills made them popular work dogs. Previously known as Reedwater Terriers and Coquetdale Terriers, the Border Terrier was recognised by the American Kennel Club in 1930.


comments powered by Disqus